Monday, October 28, 2013

tartiflette

Today I'm going to do something that I've never done before... a recipe post. You see what happened was this; on Saturday afternoon, we were watching the rugby on telly (Clermont was battling Brive in one doozy of a match), when Gregory suddenly sat up, looked and me and exclaimed, "I want Tartiflette." (These food epiphanies occur more often than not in my house.)

Because I aim to please, I said I would make Tartiflette for Sunday lunch and since Tartiflette is a French dish, I thought that maybe I'd attempt to take some photos of the process and share it with you.

Disclaimer: The following photos are far, far from food blogger territory, but practice makes perfect, right? 

If summers in Provence belong to barbecues, Aioli and Rosé, the colder weather calls for much heavier, stick to your ribs kind of fare, most of it laden with cheese, like Tartiflette.

First you start by peeling potatoes, about 1kg/ 2.2lbs of them. Boil them until they are soft enough to stick a knife through, and then drain them, letting them cool.

While the potatoes are boiling, slice a medium sized onion, and saute it with 200g of lardons. (Lardons are small cubes of pork, if you don't have lardons, you can use pancetta, Canadian bacon, or regular old bacon as a substitute. And that poses a question to any of my Canadian readers... do you just call bacon, bacon, or do you call it Canadian bacon? I have always wanted to know that.)


While that is sauteing, butter a casserole dish and set aside. When the potatoes are cool enough, slice them, and cover the bottom of the dish with a layer of about half of them. Oh, and you can go ahead and turn on the oven now too if you'd like, 235°C/ 455°F.


When the onions are soft and the lardons have rendered their fat, top the layer of potatoes with half of them like so.


Throw the other half of the potatoes on top (maybe not 'throw', layer nicely).


Then add the last of the lardons and onions on top of that. And now it's time for the goodness... spoon dollops of crème fraîche across it.


I'm going to go ahead and tell you this now, this was not enough crème fraîche. After Gregory had tasted the finished Tartiflette, I asked him if there was anything about the recipe that I should tweak for next time and he said, more cream. So there you go, don't be stingy with the crème fraîche.


Le fromage... the pièce de résistance. Traditionally, Tartiflette calls for Reblochon cheese but if you can't get your hands on any of that, you can use Brie or a mixture of Gruyere and Muenster. Slice about 250g - 500g of it, depending on how cheesy you want to get (I used about 300g), and lay it across the top. (There are lots of debates about how it should be sliced; whether it should be sliced in wide pieces, rind on or off, but it's really up to you, after all, you're the one eating it.) If you'd like, you can go ahead and pour some white wine over it, but you don't have to, it's totally optional (I did. Of course I did.)

Pop it in the oven, sit down and relax for a bit with an apéro and let the Tartiflette get all golden and bubbly, about twenty minutes or so.


Serve it with a simple salad in a light vinaigrette, nothing heavy. The presence of greens on your plate will make you feel a lot less guilty about the pile of delicious carbs and sinful cheese and cream sitting next to it.


Et voila! Sit back and enjoy the scrumptiousness and the brownie points with a bottle of crisp white wine if you are so inclined, I know I am. Bon Appétit!


Bisous!
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49 comments:

  1. That looks delicious! And not too difficult really. I'm looking out the window at work at the storm arriving and thinking a cozy warm tartiflette would hit the spot in this sort of weather!

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  2. Looks awesome! I've never tried to use a cheese like Brie for baking. What a mouthwatering thought.

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  3. One of my favorites...I really hope that portion size that you plated was just for the photo and that you actually ate a whole lot more :)

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  4. Wow, that looks fab (and easy!) I'll definitely be giving it a go, thanks so much for sharing!

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  5. Bacon, potatoes, cheese and white wine? Sounds like my kind of dish! I actually want some right now and I only had breakfast an hour ago ;-)

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  6. Mmmmm....that looks so delicious! : )

    Louisa @ My Family & Abruzzo

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  7. Australian version is peeled and sliced potatoes. Layer in casserole dish with grated cheese, bacon, pkt french onion soup powder sprinkled and a container of cream poured over the top. More grated cheese to top it all off!!! Into the oven until potatoes are cooked. Yum. X

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  8. Looks good. As others have said we may be having that one day soon...though not today as I have some sort of nasty bug which you really don't want to hear about!

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  9. I can't bu-lieve that I have never made this. Maybe I thought that it was harder and more time consuming than it is? So I thank you for this (and would love more recipe posts!) but my already big belly does not. :o

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  10. Mmm, lardons. I miss those little guys.
    This looks fantastic. No wonder you have such a happy husband!

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  11. I think this looks very professional, Sara!

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  12. This looks like a dream! You had me at: spoon dollops of crème fraîche

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  13. This looks so delicious!! I'm definitely going to have to try it out.

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  14. This looks sooooo good! And relatively easy too! I will start searching for the ingredients...maybe something to put out on Christmas day as people are in and out....yummmm

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  15. Oh man, now I'm going to have make a tartiflette soon! My version contains no creme fraiche but definitely the white wine! :) I also just buy a whole reblochon and then cut it in half length-wise (like when you're cutting a layer cake in half) and then I lay the two circles side by side on top of the potatoes so all of the cheesy goodness melts down onto the potatoes. *drool*

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  16. That looks so yummy! As for Canadian bacon, in the part of Canada where I live (eastern Ontario) we call it back bacon, or peameal bacon, but never just bacon, and never never 'Canadian bacon', that's just weird.

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  17. Looks delicious! Definitely going to try it.

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  18. That sounds really good! How can it not be?! :-) It's funny you said that about posting a recipe. I never have either and I was contemplating it.

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  19. yum!! i love potatoes and cheese, so this looks so so amazing!
    -- jackie @ jade and oak

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  20. I made this last winter and instantly gained 5 ibs. It was delicious, though! I see that no Canadians have yet responded to the bacon question....hope one does!

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  21. Oops, apologies, and thanks, Valerie! Now we know.

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  22. Darling, so French! This looks and sounds so good. I need to get at least ONE baking dish that fits inside a toaster oven so I can make this for myself when the winter chill hits Paris.

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  23. Yum! I had some tartiflette for lunch actually :)

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  24. I am so happy that you broke down and shared a recipe. I love tartiflette but have never made one. Oh, and I love the way you throw out those random questions about the Canadian bacon. Thanks for sharing.

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  25. OMG I had this dish in Paris on my birthday last year, but had NO IDEA what it was...just that it was delicious and I needed more of it in my life. Now I know!!!!!!

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  26. Oooooh YUM!!! Just finished a disgusting sweaty workout and want to reclaim all of those cals with this plate of French goodness. I'm actually going to give this bad boy a try using this Sara LPV exclusive recipe! Will let you know how it comes out...or how it doesn't.

    Bravo to you for cooking French fare. It's impressive. :) !

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  27. aside from the fact that I really hate onions, this sounds SO good! I mean, you really can't go wrong with cheese and potatoes and bacon-like meat.

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  28. Wipes drool off keyboard... I do love me a good tartiflette!

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  29. My mouth is watering...i so want to make that sometime very soon. Yum!

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  30. This looks like a delicious recipe! My boyfriend has made this many times before, but I don't think he's ever added in creme fraiche. I'll have to suggest it for the next time!

    -Shannon

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  31. This looks incredibly delicious and not difficult at all. I'm going to give it a try on a really cold night.

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  32. Well well well. The second I'm done with this stupid Paleo detox my household is doing I am making this. Looks delicious! I recently fell in love with lardon in Lyon and actually in a Salad Lyonnaise, why don't we eat more of this stuff around the world?! It is the best!

    abroadsworld.blogspot.com

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  33. Thank you for the wonderful recipe! Here in Zurich, Switzerland we have a version of the same dish with a layer of drained sauerkraut in the middle. Reblochon is one of my very favorite cheese. I am excited to give your recipe a go!
    Ashley in Zurich

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  34. Sara, you have come so far ... first you learned to speak French and now you are cooking French food and ... using kilograms! So proud of you! This is a must for a cold winter night in Central Virginia! thanks ... er, merci!

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  35. My husband would probably get a response of "and I want a diamond ring" but it does look yummy. Tartiflette is pretty darn good too.

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  36. Tartiflette pizzas are pretty darn goos too.

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  37. That looks amazing! I will give it a try. :)

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  38. This looks so amazing. I wish I could eat it. :( (I have gallbladder problems and can't eat much fat at all.)

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  39. You need to give yourself a little more credit! These photos are delicious....I mean beautiful. Seriously, now my stomach is growling and it's still an hour until lunch time.

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  40. Are you sure it should be cooked at 455 F? In my oven it would be burnt to a crisp in 20 minutes. I'd cook it at 350 or 375 F here in Indiana. :-)

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  41. Oh. My. Goodness. I can't even...this is like all of my favorite things in one dish. I wish I was eating this right now! YUM!

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  42. I love tartiflette - real comfort food! A friend gave me the recipe after she had enjoyed it during a skiing holiday and we add white wine too and double cream!! I should try your recipe with crème fraîche as a healthier alternative! I managed to find Reblochon here too.
    http://missbbobochic.blogspot.co.uk/

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  43. Oh my, tartiflette! Such an evil little beast and so delicious!

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  44. OH MY HOLY GOD I WANT THAT PLEASE.

    (I can't find proper lardons in America, and chopping up bacon is NOT the same. they have them in England though, thank goodness!)

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  45. Canadians call 'Canadian bacon' back bacon or pea-meal bacon (because it's fried in pea-meal). Our bacon they call side bacon. Apparently it's all anatomically correct. Whatever. That's all courtesy of your very favorite Canadian! xx

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  46. OMG CREME FRAICHE AND REBLECHON TOGETHER?! PLUS BACON?! I CANT EVEN.

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